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Archived Answers to Your Questions about Victorville roads and traffic

  • 07/02/07 Where can residents find information about the realignment of US Hwy 395 and in particular Alternative "H"?
    SANBAG is the lead agency on the environmental study for the US-395 Realignment from I-15 to around Desert Flower Road in the north part of Adelanto, about a 22 mile stretch. Caltrans is concurrently doing an environmental study for a 44 mile stretch from I-15 to SR 58. The City of Victorville City Council opposed Alternative H and nothing has changed with Victorville’s position.

    To get the latest information on the realignment, you can go to the SANBAG website at www.sanbag.ca.gov/us395 or call SANBAG at (909) 884-8276.

  • 07/02/07 What is the city of Victorville doing to provide alternative transportation? And are there any plans for new bicycle paths?
    The City of Victorville has a bicycle plan that is part of the City's General Plan. The current General Plan shows planned bicycle routes along some major roads, power line corridors, etc. The plan needs to be revised to indentify bikeways that would be more feasible and safer for bicycle travel. There are three classes of bikeways. Class I is a bike path that is separated from vehicular traffic. Class II is a bike lane that is striped on the street pavement adjacent to a travel lane for vehicles. Class III is a bike route that shares a lane with vehicles but with signs to indicate the route. The Planning Division is in the process of updating the General Plan now. The Engineering Department will be working with Planning on updating the bicycle plan. I cannot tell you when new bicycle routes would be constructed, but the City will be planning for some in the future.

  • 06/27/07: What would it take to get a four way stop sign put in on the corners of Hook Blvd and Reno Loop in Brentwood, Victorville?
    The City has done some things on Hook and Reno Loop West, such as trimming the landscaping to improve sight distance and adding intersection warning signs. The Engineering Department will re-evaluate both of the Hook Blvd. / Reno Loop West and Hook Blvd. / Reno Loop East intersections, including the school traffic when school is back in session in September.

    For the City of Victorville, the installation of all-way stop signs at an intersection must go through the following process:

    1. The intersection is studied for traffic volumes, speeds and the collision history. Warrants (or minimum requirements) are checked from the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and the California Supplement to the MUTCD.

    2. If the Engineering Department determines that the intersection meets the warrants and the all-way stop is justified, the item is recommended for approval to the Traffic Advisory Committee.

    3. The item is then recommended for approval to the City Council who is the authority that approves all-way stop intersections.

    4. Following City Council approval, the installation of the all-way stop would be ordered by the Engineering Department.

    There is no need to go to a City Council meeting or sign a petition to request a stop sign. However, any City Council meeting is open for public comments.

    Speeding on City streets is a difficult problem to address. Speed control is not a warrant for stop signs. Also, studies have shown that speed limit signs have no significant effect on how fast people actually drive. Selective enforcement by the Police can have an effect, as they focus on various streets in the City.

  • 06/20/07:What happened to the traffic signals at Palmdale Rd., Kentwood and Park recently? Can we go back to the way it was?
    The timing had been changed when Caltrans had replaced one of the controllers (the computer that controls the traffic signal.) This caused the signal system on Palmdale Road from 7th Street to Amargosa Road to become unsynchronized. Caltrans controls all the signals on Palmdale Road, which is State Route 18, from the I-15 ramps to the west. Their system is synchronized with the City of Victorville signals on 7th Street. On Tuesday, June 19, the synchronized timing was restored by Caltrans.

  • 06/11/07 Does the city plan on making Luna and Pacoima a 4-way stop? If not, can a resident request a study for an intersection? 
    The north half of Luna Road from west of San Martin Road to El Rio Road is in a County unincorporated area. All of Luna Road between El Evado Road and Las Brisa Road is in a County area. At the intersection of Luna Road and Pacoima Road, the County controls the north half; Victorville controls the south half. Any changes to the intersection would involve a joint approval from the City and the County. The Engineering Department will study this intersection to determine if an all-way stop is justified.

    For the City of Victorville, the installation of all-way stop signs at an intersection must go through the following process:

    1. The intersection is studied for traffic volumes, speeds and the collision history. Warrants (or minimum requirements) are checked from the Manual of Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and the California Supplement to the MUTCD.
    2. If the Engineering Department determines that the intersection meets the warrants and the all-way stop is justified, the item is recommended for approval to the Traffic Advisory Committee.
    3. The County of San Bernardino would need to concur with the approval, if the intersection is shared.
    4. The item is then recommended for approval to the City Council who is the authority that approves all-way stop intersections.
    5. Following City Council approval, and the County’s concurrence, the installation of the all-way stop would be ordered by the Engineering Department.

    Speeding on City streets is a difficult problem to address. Speed control is not a warrant for stop signs. Also, studies have shown that speed limit signs have no significant effect on how fast people actually drive. Selective enforcement by the Police can have an effect, as they focus on various streets in the City.

  • 05/25/07: Traffic lights don't seem to be synchronized very well - why?
    When traffic volumes are very high, the heavy congestion makes it appear as if the signals are not coordinated. If the signals were not synchronized (coordinated) the congestion would be even worse. The systems are monitored, but when a road is heavily congested, only minor adjustments can be made to accommodate changes in the traffic flow. The City has gone to extensive efforts on the Bear Valley Road coordinated system, that runs over five miles from Jacaranda Avenue, across I-15 to Dunia Road. A few years ago, traffic signals were modified and a new timing plan was implemented. About a year ago the City also implemented, at its own expense, new timing on Palmdale Road, which is under Caltrans jurisdiction. The Palmdale Road system ties into the City's coordinated system on 7th Street that runs from D Street, to Green Tree Blvd., then across I-15, on Palmdale Road to Amargosa Road. This system is about 3 miles long.

  • 05-14-07: 4-way stop hazard - Why are signs covered?
    There is a 4-way stop causing a traffic hazard in Victorville at the corner of Silica and First Ave. There were already 2 stop signs for the East/West direction. Two additional signs have been put in for the North/South direction due to the Nisqualli project going on. The problem is that the North/South signs have black plastic bags covering them. These stop signs are causing a traffic hazard. I know it means they are not in service yet. But! there are drivers who don't know any better and is causing not only confusion but near miss accidents. What’s the hold up? Why not uncover them?

    Brian's Answer:
    The Silica Road / First Avenue intersection will be a new four-way stop. When new stop signs are installed at an intersection with an arterial or collector road, such as First Avenue, a City policy is applied. The policy has been in use for over twenty years. The intent of the policy is to get the motorist used to the new stop signs before they become effective. It typically takes some time before the motorist becomes accustomed to the change. The policy requires bagging the signs for approximately one week, installing Stop Ahead signs with flashing warning lights and "Botts' dots" on the major street approaches to the intersection.

  • 05-07-07: Pedestrian Light Traffic
    I have a question having to do with the pedestrian traffic light at the intersections of Amargosa and Bear Valley Roads, and the exit from Lowes onto Bear Valley Road at Mall Boulevard. Both of these intersections have the pedestrian traffic crossing at the same time that the northbound left turn lane light is green. In essence, this causes either no cars or one car at most to be able to make the left turn onto Bear Valley Road.

    My question is this, why not have the pedestrian traffic cross at the same time the southbound traffic has a green light? By doing this, the pedestrian only blocks the turning movement of the traffic turning right onto Bear Valley Road and only for a short period of time. In addition, the cars turning right onto Bear Valley Road have additional times when they can turn right whereas the traffic turning left onto Bear Valley has only one chance and for a very brief period of time at that.

    Brian's Answer:
    Bear Valley Road is very wide at Amargosa Road and requires a long pedestrian clearance time to cross in the north-south direction. This time exceeds the amount of time allocated for the southbound traffic, so pedestrians must cross during both the northbound and southbound movements. This technique is often used when the pedestrian activity is low, and the time to cross greatly exceeds the time needed for the vehicles of the corresponding movement.

    If the southbound time were lengthened to coincide with the pedestrian crossing time, it would take time away from the eastbound and westbound movements and cause more congestion. Bear Valley Road has coordinated signals with a fixed cycle length (the total amount of time to go through all the directions of traffic through the intersection). To give more time to one direction, time must be taken from another. The times must be balanced for all directions or the congestion will be even worse.

  • 4-30-07: Bear Valley Road Traffic
    I lived in Victorville for many years and recently moved to Jess Ranch in Apple Valley. Now that I live in Apple Valley, I realize that some of the traffic is coming from Apple Valley drivers trying to get to the freeway or the Mall. I know Victorville is responsible for Bear Valley Road, but does Apple Valley give Victorville any money to improve Bear Valley Road?

    Brian's Answer:
    The average daily traffic (ADT) on Bear Valley Road (number of vehicles in a 24 hour period) from the fall of 2005 was as follows:

Location

Highest day

7-day Average

At the Mojave River

58,200

52,200

West of 2nd Ave

53,100

49,100

Between Mariposa Rd & the I-15 northbound ramps

73,500

69,300

The ADT at the Mojave River was about 75% to 79% of the ADT near I-15. Victorville is responsible for only part of Bear Valley Road, because it lies within four different jurisdictions. Each of the local governments are responsible for maintaining the road within their respective jurisdiction. In general, they do not pay one another for improvements or maintenance outside of their limits.

The jurisdictional limits are as follows: From the Mojave River to the east, it lies within Apple Valley (to the Town limits). Between the Mojave River and I-15, the north half is in Victorville, and the south half is in Hesperia (although because the road curves, the City limits are not always at the center of the road). From I-15 to the City limits (two miles west of US 395) it lies within Victorville. It is called Duncan Road west of US 395. Beyond the Town or City limits, it lies within the unincorporated County of San Bernardino.

There is a cooperative agreement between Victorville and Hesperia for maintenance and timing modification of the traffic signals for twelve shared intersections. Apple Valley, Hesperia and Victorville also completed a joint federally funded project that rehabilitated pavement and improved a number of intersections from I-15 to Kiowa Road, on about eight miles of Bear Valley Road. The local governments matched the federal grant with some of their local funding.


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